Thursday, January 07, 2010

Another Food Adventure

I try to pick up something new for the family to taste on each outing to our local stores. I try to choose something I think they'll like. The goal is for them to learn new things can be FUN; not always gross. ::snort::

Yesterday I picked up something that looked like pretzel sticks. I thought they might be sesame. I doubt they were sesame and they weren't pretzels. Sort of a baked short, stick.....a HOT and SWEET taste all at once. They're disappearing, so someone else thinks they're good. The writing is all in Kanji. I can't even provide a Romanji name for them.

This is the other item I picked up. I suppose I was fascinated by Aomori Nebuta and the pig hiney on the front.

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Aomori is our prefecture. Nebuta, I couldn't decipher. Choco Crunch sounded promising.

Jared couldn't figure out Nebuta either.

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We did find other writing on the side of the package. Buta Hana.

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Ah, ha! Pig Snout...suddenly the logo becomes clear. Just as suddenly apprehension grows. I assured all. Surely there will not be a chocolate covered pig snout in the box. Some remembered タコのゆで団子, the octopus dumplings. ::snort::

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So cute, surely NOT actual chocolate pig snouts.

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A layer of chocolate, with rice mixed in, covered by an artistic layer that looks like a...well...pig snout.

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Some tried it right away...the younger two boys had to be manhandled into trying it....but it really was fairly tasty.

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I lovingly cajole my reluctant eaters, "Try it, or next time it's the bag of fishies!" Gold fish have a whole new meaning over here. ::snort::

Nebuta - could it mean "the pig" or just another way to spell "pig"? I need to find better translators...the ones I'm finding on line don't seem to translate Romanji to English. Of course there are four alphabets in Japan - Hiragana, Katakana, Kanji and Romanji. ::snort::

JOSIAH & JAMIN ARE HOME!
Choosing Joy!
©2010 D.R.G.

~Coram Deo~
Living all of life before the face of God...

Tonami Clan Memorial Tourist Village

This was one of my favorite spots on the Right Start Tours when we arrived. It was very rushed and I've planned to go back and explore at my own pace. We went back last Saturday, when the girls were here, only to discover it was closed. Mike took the van to work today - the tire may be ready. That left us a car that was drivable without worry of exploding tires. We decided to head to Tonami. I called first. ::snort::

The drive to the memorial included rain, snow, hail and slush. We were the ONLY people at the "Samurai house" and at the village. This makes it so nice to explore and linger...and get photos without a tourist's ear in the corner of the photo.

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Hirosawa Yasutou, from the Tonami Clan, is famous for bringing Western farming techniques to Japan. He had his farm/ranch here in Misawa.
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It is said that to convince the Emperor that he should be allowed to experiment with farming and ranching, rather than hold a political position, he took to breeding war horses. This kept with the Japanese government of the time's policy of "wealthy nation and strong army." This area is famous for it's horses.
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The memorial is set up with life exhibits in the home.

We warned them to duck ::snort:: That's the door jam.

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Set in a bamboo grove
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Do you think this is a picnic table?
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There is a museum with farm equipment. That's all we saw on the tour. TODAY we discovered there is also a village set up with displays and statues, animals, golf, go-carts, battery cars, miniature golf (of course those are seasonal). We'll be back when it warms up. There was also a store where we bought some produce and such from.

I didn't buy this....

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Raw, local honey - yum - but not worth over $36 a quart. I'll keep looking.

We weren't able to read many of the exhibits....maybe when Ryu and Kim are here we'll visit again. LOL They did have some of the signs in English.

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We were thrilled when Jared first (and then I helped out)were able to carry on a whole conversation with the gardener to verify that we were allowed to walk amongst the animal pens. We're a great team.

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In addition there were peacocks, roosters, chickens and some animals we couldn't identify.

This sign amused us as we imagined HOW to play golf without breaking rule number 1.

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There was a Christmas Tree filled with little Miss Veedols....I really need to go back and catch the light ceremony in the next couple of nights.

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Arielle, Nolan and I figured this sign out...I think....

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It would be 69 and so we are guessing this is a sign to the Residence of 69 Kinds of Wild Herbs, as there was literature about Yasutou putting on a show of his findings of the 69 kinds of wild herbs eaten by cattle and horses. He also wrote a book titled, "Five Year Story of Running a Ranch."

This was a fun outing. On our way home I took a "short cut" which ended up not being a short cut to the POL road but to Towada.....I think it may be quicker for us to take that route to Aomori. My kids are such pros. Not one whimper about being lost as we climbed the snowy hills....it was an ADVENTURE! ::snort::

Driving directions are here if you'd like a direct route to the Memorial.

JOSIAH & JAMIN ARE HOME!
Choosing Joy!
©2009 D.R.G.

~Coram Deo~
Living all of life before the face of God...